ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 44

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

LIBERTY, EGALITY, SORORITY
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Nisa Villers, Self-Portrait, 1796,
New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art.
Oil on canvas, 161.3 x 128.6 cm.


Anne Lafont

Liberty, Equality, Sorority: The Art of 1800



Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Staff: Carole Gautier and Cécile Pichon-Bonin
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTERS

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN's FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

values in formation

nominalism

ANCIENT ROME

ON EVALUATION

NEW SOVIET FASHIONS

KLEINIAN ECONOMICS

POLICIES OF THE REAL

TOCQUEVILLE AND THE ARTS IN DEMOCRACY

an elitist aesthetic for everyone

The artist as teacher

The equal of history

passion for philosophy and passion for equality in the age of the enlightenment

DEMOCRATIC ART IN ACTION

ART AND EQUALITY IN THE GERMAN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC

FRANS MASEREEL (1889-1972) : IDEALISM IN THE ART OF AN EYEWITNESS TO HISTORY

THE PASSIONS AS ENIGMAS




 
EDITORIAL

 

          Anne Lafont reexamines the aftermath of the French Revolution, where the imperatives of equality and liberty held sway, though not that of the “fraternity” that had also been inscribed within the program—at least not when it came to women.  Even though the author is well aware that the category of the “modern” had long ago been undermined, she is working to advance, through affirmative action, the work of writers and artists—including, but not limited to, Élizabeth Vigée-Lebrun, whose public involvements earned her a reputation as a monster.  That reputation was, in her case, to lend her wings, already tested by men, that would come to inspire respect for her life, her work, her “matronage,” and her Conseils pour la peinture de portrait (Advice for portrait painting).
          In examining the history of creative women, most of whom are still neglected, Lafont delineates circles, networks, and forms of solidarity, but also some of the forms of self-representation they created in order to win recognition for themselves on an arts scene in which it was still mainly men who stood out.


Laurence Bertrand Dorléac


       

Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France
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