ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 42

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

HARTUNG-BERGMAN FOUNDATION SEMINAR
JUNE 2011
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Hartung-Bergman Foundation

Olivier Van den Bossche

Frans Masereel (1889-1972): Idealism in the Art of an Eyewitness to History


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Staff: Carole Gautier and Cécile Pichon-Bonin
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTERS

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN's FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

values in formation

nominalism

ANCIENT ROME

ON EVALUATION

NEW SOVIET FASHIONS

KLEINIAN ECONOMICS

POLICIES OF THE REAL

TOCQUEVILLE AND THE ARTS IN DEMOCRACY

an elitist aesthetic for everyone

The artist as teacher

The equal of history

passion for philosophy and passion for equality in the age of the enlightenment

DEMOCRATIC ART IN ACTION

ART AND EQUALITY IN THE GERMAN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC




 
EDITORIAL

 
   

       Frans Masereel was a Belgian artist whose engraving work has had a lasting influence on the genre.  Such influence spread a bit everywhere and even as far away as China, where he had emulators as early as the 1930s, starting when his works were brought there clandestinely.  Known for adding an acid stroke to his commitments against poverty, war, and fascism, he is to be counted among the idealistic artists who have struggled their whole lives long for a more just and egalitarian society, as Olivier Van den Bossche has shown.  Masereel, we see here, was at once lucid about the great political crises of his time and remained manifestly impermeable to the reality of Communist regimes.




Laurence Bertrand Dorléac


       

Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France
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