ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 37

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

THE ARTIST AS TEACHER


Yves Klein during his lecture at the Sorbonne, June 3, 1959.


Antje Kramer
The Artist as Teacher:
On the Egalitarian Myths of Arts Education After 1960



Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Staff: Carole Gautier and Cécile Pichon-Bonin
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTERS

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN's FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

values in formation

nominalism

ANCIENT ROME

ON EVALUATION

NEW SOVIET FASHIONS

KLEINIAN ECONOMICS

POLICIES OF THE REAL

TOCQUEVILLE AND THE ARTS IN DEMOCRACY

an elitist aesthetic for everyone




 
EDITORIAL

 


 
    We know Antje Kramer because of her thesis on Les Nouveaux Réalistes en Allemagne (1957-1963) (The New Realists in Germany, 1957-1963), forthcoming from Presses du Réel. Here, she studies the figure of the artist as teacher in the 1960s and 1970s through the writings and actions of Yves Klein, George Maciunas, Friedensreich Hundertwasser, Wolf Vostell, and Joseph Beuys.  Concerned above all with bringing about radical societal changes while dreaming of an ideal new world to be born from a universalist form of education in which equality would reign, they were unable to avoid the contradictions of utopians belong to an elite that guarantees its superiority by becoming artists.  Going back through history, Kramer brings out the peculiarity of this era in which art was no longer conceived in terms of a transmission of artistic knowledge and skills but instead as a laboratory for the creation of a new world and a new man.

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac



Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

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