ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 33

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

POLICIES OF THE REAL



Mathilde Arnoux
Reality, the Visual Arts, and the Cold War

François Michaud
Too Much Reality ?




Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Staff: Elodie Antoine and Cécile Pichon-Bonin
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTERS

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibif?tions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN'S FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

values in formation

nominalism

ANCIENT ROME

on evaluation

new soviet fashions

 

 




 
EDITORIAL

 


 
       The notion of the real has always been open to debate, especially among artists who have never attributed to it the same form. More than once has it served to defend opposing world views, even competing societal models.
       To Each His Real is the title of the major research project being directed by Mathilde Arnoux at the Centre allemand d’histoire de l’art in Paris as part of the European Research Council’s Starting Grant Program. Taking France, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, and Poland from the 1960s to the late 1980s as the scale of study, an examination of the differing senses of the real on both sides of the Iron Curtain will patently become, at the cost of fresh effort, one of the ways of writing the history of art of that era.
       That is the task François Michaud, curator at the City of Paris's Museum of Modern Art, sets for himself when, taking the work of the Romanian artist André Cadere as an example, he responds in his own way to the new questions being raised.


Laurence Bertrand Dorléac



Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

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