ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 29

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

ANCIENT ROME


Belvedere Apollo

Alexandre Grandazzi
Rome and Greek Art

Valérie Naas
Pliny the Elder and Reflection on the Art of Antiquity


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Staff: Elodie Antoine and Cécile Pichon-Bonin
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTERS

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN'S FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

values in formation

nominalism

 




 
EDITORIAL

 


        
 
       One must go back to Ancient Rome in order to study the burgeoning relationships between art and society at a time when images had already become the dominant means of expression. Valérie Naas offers us a valuable critical appreciation of Pliny the Elder’s Natural History, a key source on ancient art. She thus reveals the role art-as-war-booty played for the victors who had brought countless statues back to Rome.
       Alexandre Grandazzi emphatically shows how original was the framework within which these transfers took place, and he also brings out the political impact of this form of art that was not yet so named. The Romans carried off the masterpieces of Greece, but also and especially they brought back with them a model, stealing thereby from the vanquished their creative powers while admiring them to the point of imitating their style and making a host of copies. By imposing a new context and new edifying figures on this largely borrowed form of art, the Romans conferred upon it a new role as a unifier for an empire that was destined to promote “the Roman way of life.”


Laurence Bertrand Dorléac




Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

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