ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 27

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

VALUES IN FORMATION


Citroën Picasso C4

Simon Njami
The Principle and the Reality

Pascal Petit
The Value of the Work of Art . . . and of the Artist:On the Feverishness of Markets and Beyond


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Assistant: Elodie Antoine
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTER

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN'S FACTORY ?

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

THE POWER OF ARTISTS

 




 
EDITORIAL

 


        
 
       Bringing together someone involved in the world of art and an economic specialist is one of the ground rules for our seminar this year.
       Simon Njami is well known for the texts he has written and for the exhibitions he has organized. We are indebted to him, in particular, for an African self-definition of Africans’ sense of contemporaneity, freed from Western criteria. Here, he offers a Deleuzean reading of the intransigent rules of the international art market.
       The economist Philippe Petit responds to him that as things go for art so do they go for everything else--with the slight proviso that the economic world cannot--even if it wanted to--domesticate everything. He reminds us that the community of economists has a hard time defining what a market is and how values are formed therein: the art object, it seems to him, occupies a unique place there, if only because the value assigned thereto goes far beyond its mere financialization. A work of art would thus be, according to him, a sort of symbolic rampart grounded in an empathic dimension open to the problems of the other, which would make it a favorable site for citizen appropriation.

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac




Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

Contact