ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 25

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

THE POWER OF ARTISTS


Alexandra Exter in front of Nadezhda Udaltsova’s paintings at The Store exhibition. Moscow, 1916.


Elitza Dulguerova
The Store : Negotiating Exhibition Value at the Time of the Russian Avant-Garde

Olga Medvedkova
Kandinsky in 1901, or the Critique of Critics


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Assistant: Elodie Antoine
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTER

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN'S FACTORY

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

MONEY

Icons

 




 
EDITORIAL

 

 

 


        
 
       Traditionally, people have often wanted to leave the last word to writers. Since Antiquity, with Philostratus, this has been because the critic was supposed to go beyond the world of appearances by sifting out a meaning and a moral, whereas the artist was suspected of doing nothing but representing forms through the use of other forms. Artists have regularly challenged this idea by imposing their own viewpoint and winning acceptance for the idea that mediators prevent people from seeing works and from appreciating them as they ought to be. Indeed, they have regularly created a crisis for the established hierarchies. In particular, during the early twentieth century, avant-garde movements have shaken up not only the established forms but also the way in which forms are learned, presented, sold, and commented upon. Thus, as Olga Medvedkova tells us, as early as 1901 Wassily Kandinsky violently attacked critics, and more generally all mediators, whom he accused of being parasitic. As for Elitza Dulguerova, what she reveals to us is the powerful case of Vladimir Tatlin and his 1916 Futurist exhibition in Moscow, The Store, which called back into question the rules governing the arts scene as regards the art economy.

       These two quite original research papers reveal to us a major facet of the critical role played by artists themselves, who are no strangers to the politics of art and are, rather, active agents in its implementation.

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac




Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

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