ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 23

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

money





“L’Argent” exhibition invitation card. Image taken from Cesare Pietroiusti & Paul Griffiths, Eating Money--An Auction, 2007.
Video transferred onto DVD. 4'. Courtesy of the artist. 500-euro bill: 7.5 x 14.5 cm. 5-euro bill: 5.8 x 11.3 cm. Courtesy of the Pork Collection, Copenhagen.


Elisabeth Lebovici and Caroline Bourgeois
Money at the Plateau

 


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Assistant: Elodie Antoine
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTER

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

JOSEPH BEUYS : A SHAMAN'S FACTORY

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius

PREHISTORIES

POSTWAR

 




 
EDITORIAL

 


        
 
        “Our way of life resembles a fair,” wrote the Stoic Epictetus. “The flocks and herds are passing along to be sold, and the greater part of the crowd to buy and sell. But there are some few who come only to look at the fair, to inquire how and why it is being held, upon what authority and with what object” (Epictetus, The Golden Sayings of Epictetus, translated and arranged by Hastings Crossley [New York: P. F. Collier & Son Company, 1909-14]: LXVIII). Recounting the fair before departing is also the role of the art historian who looks into the market. Indeed, this year our seminars will be devoted in large part to economics while events are already relegating to the past a number of the methods connected with the growing financialization of the world of art.
        We begin with Elizabeth Lebovici and Caroline Bourgeois’s exhibition about money. For, it allows us to enter into the subject through works of art themselves. For the past three decades, art works have in large part been occulted by the emphasis placed on their financial value, while the general euphoria has increased tenfold the likelihood of their being forgotten in favor of the “market,” which had ended up being viewed as running the show. Tobias Meyer, Sotheby's worldwide head of contemporary art and auctioneer, is said to have declared that "the best art is the most expensive, because the market is so smart".
(http://artforum.com/diary/id=10968).
        The quality of Lebovici and Bourgeois’s offering at Le Plateau, which was carried out with the limited resources at hand, opened onto some essential questions. For, it showed the extent to which artists have been working on the issue of economic links, going so far as to establish their own businesses.

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac




Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

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