ARTS & SOCIETIES
 

LETTER OF SEMINAR 21

Centre d’Histoire de Sciences Po

 
 
 

PREHISTORIES


Lucille Swann, supervised by Franz Weidenreich, “Nelly” (Sinanthropus pekinensis), 1937 (Teilhard de Chardin Foundation photo).


Arnaud Hurel
The Paleoanthropologist and the Artist


Editorial Director: Laurence Bertrand Dorléac
Editorial Assistant: Elodie Antoine
Translator: David Ames Curtis

PREVIOUS LETTER

THE INFLUENCE OF THE SAINT-SIMONIANS AND THE IDEA OF ART IN THE VANGUARD OF THE SOCIAL REFORM

BODY MORALITY

DANDIES

The Model Child

THE BEAUTIFUL AND THE USEFUL

Photographs by amateurs

The market, at the start

art in the republic

the voyage of the avant-gardes

Major exhibitions

WHAT IS SOCIAL ART ?

PRIMITIVISMS

realisms

Joseph Beuys : A shaman's factory

the Artist and the philosopher

appropriations

THE OPACITIES OF THE TECHNOLOGY

Alternatives to the art market in new york

genius




 
EDITORIAL


    

 


        Arnaud Hurel gained a name for himself with the recent publication of a book on the history of his field of study. His volume La France préhistorienne de 1789 à 1941 (Prehistorians’ France from 1789 to 1941) examines this field starting from that paradoxical revolutionary moment when the notion of a “collective heritage [patrimoine collectif]” was invented, even as one wanted to struggle against the signs of the old world. In the case of prehistory, the creation of representations of the very distant past was to accompany the development of knowledge. Here, the author offers us his reflections on these increasingly sophisticated museographical reconstructions, from the life-size dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins shown at the Crystal Palace in 1851 to those of Jurassic Park, and passing by way of the Javanese Pithecanthropus erectus presented by Eugène Dubois in the Dutch India Pavilion at the Paris Universal Exhibition of 1900. Here, as elsewhere, scientists were torn between the duty to admit the gaps in their knowledge and the temptation to make their picks in the great roman à clef of humanity. As for the public, what it cries out for are detailed likenesses that would allow it to believe it knows the truth.
       

Laurence Bertrand Dorléac






Letter published with the support of the Foundation of France

Contact